The White Queen – Book Review

The White Queen is the second book in Philippa Gregory’s Cousins’ War Series. Now, I know I said The Red Queen was the second book, however I was corrected and it is actually the third (oops). Although, I do think you can read either one before the other as they are set during roughly the same time, just different points of view.

As many of you know, a few months ago I knew next to nothing about the Wars of the Roses, especially the people who took part. So, as you can expect, I didn’t know much about Elizabeth Woodville. I only knew about her from the other books in the series I read. After reading The Lady of the Rivers and The Red Queen, I expected witchcraft and that is what I got. It did annoy me a little but I managed to keep reading because this is actually a great book.

I originally did like Elizabeth Woodville, however as the story went on I started to dislike her more and more. I agreed more with her daughter, also called Elizabeth. Once Elizabeth Woodville got a taste of power and the throne, that was all she wanted. She sent an innocent boy to the Tower, knowing he might be harmed, and didn’t blink. She kept her daughters in sanctuary when they wanted to get out, be back at court.

I did like Philippa Gregory’s different take on the story of the princes in the tower. Most people just assume that Richard III did it and that Perkin Warbeck was an impostor, not the real Prince Richard. It is nice and almost refreshing to see someone not taking that same view and instead acting as if Perkin was really Richard. We will never know what really happened to the princes, that’s what makes it so interesting.

I think I enjoyed this book just a little more than The Red Queen, probably because more was going on with the birth of Elizabeth’s children, Edward dying etc. Like the rest in the series, I recommend this to anyone that likes historical fiction but isn’t too worried about accuracy.

Rating: 4.5/5

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