12th August 1596 – Henry Carey’s Burial

Henry Carey, 1st Baron Hunsdon and son of Mary Boleyn, was buried on the 12th August 1596 at Westminster Abbey. He was rumoured to be the son of Henry VIII.

On his deathbed, his cousin, Elizabeth I, offered to create him Earl of Wiltshire. However, he refused and said:

“Madam, as you did not count me worthy of this honour in life, then I shall account myself not worthy of it in death.”

He died on the 23rd July at Somerset House and Elizabeth I paid for his funeral at the Abbey. The monument to Henry Carey in St John the Baptist’s chapel is the tallest in Westminster Abbey, at thirty-six feet high. The monument was erected before 1603 by his widow and son. The Latin inscription can be translated:

‘Consecrated for the burial of the Hunsdon family. Here sleeps in the Lord Henry Carey, Baron Hunsdon, one-time Governor of the town of Berwick, Warden of the east marches towards Scotland, Captain of the gentleman-pensioners, Chief Justice of the Forests south of the Trent, Knight of the Order of the Garter, Lord Chamberlain of the Lady Queen Elizabeth, sworn of the Privy Council, and first cousin to the aforesaid Queen. Together with him is buried Anne, his dearest wife, daughter of Thomas Morgan, knight, who bore him many children, of whom there survive George, John, Edmund and Robert, knights, Catherine, Countess of Nottingham, Philadelphia, Baroness Scrope, and Margaret, Lady Hoby. He died 23 July 1596 aged 71. His son, George Carey, Baron Hunsdon, member of the Order of the Garter, Captain-General of the Isle of Wight, Chamberlain of the household to Queen Elizabeth, Privy Councillor, and his wife Anne, placed this monument to the best of fathers and dearest of husbands, in his honour and memory, and being mindful of their own and their family’s mortality.’

Sources

Henry Carey Wikipedia Page

Westminster Abbey Page

Carey-monument

The monument at Westminster Abbey.

 

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